The right tool?

The next time you notice something being done in Excel where you work, take a moment to question whether it’s the right tool for the job, or whether you or someone in your organisation is a tool for allowing its use.

No, not my words, but from the FT’s consistently excellent Alphaville blog. The point is, it’s easy to use Excel. But it’s very hard to use Excel well.

There are many people out there who can use Excel to solve a problem. They knock up a spreadsheet with a few clicks of the mouse, some dragging and dropping, a few whizzo functions, some spiffy charts, and it all looks really slick. But what if anything needs to be changed? Sensitivity testing? And how do you know you got it right in the first place? Building spreadsheets is an area in which people are overconfident of their abilities, and tend to think that nothing can go wrong.

Instead of automatically reaching for the mouse, why not Stop Clicking, Start Typing?

But we won’t. There’s a huge tendency to avoid learning new things, and everyone thinks they know how to use Excel. The trouble is, they know how to use it for displaying data (mostly), and don’t realise that what they are really doing is computer programming. A friend of mine works with a bunch of biologists, and says

I spend most of my time doing statistical analyses and developing new statistical methods in R. Then the biologists stomp all over it with Excel, trash their own data, get horribly confused, and complain that “they’re not programmers” so they won’t use R.

But that’s the problem. They are programmers, whether they like it or not.

Personally, I don’t think that things will change. We’ll keep on using Excel, there will keep on being major errors in what we do, and we’ll continue to throw up our hands in horror. But it’s rather depressing — it’s so damned inefficient, if nothing else.

 

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1 Comment

  1. Excel is so popular because users think it is simple and easy to use. However, as you say, it is hard to use Excel well. The result is that around 95% of spreadsheets contain errors.

    Since we like this article, we’ve added it to Connexion, our collection of the most useful and interesting spreadsheet-related articles from the web at http://www.i-nth.com/resources/connexion

    By the way, we’re a fan of your work – several of your publications are listed in our bibliography of spreadsheet errors and testing at http://www.i-nth.com/resources/bibliography

    Cheers,

    Bob.

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